This is What Democracy Looks Like

Words & Pictures by Mary Warner

More than half a million people converged in D.C., and millions more gathered around the U.S. (and the world) making the March for Women the largest march in the history of the U.S. In D.C., a young girl takes in the sea of signs on the National Mall.

More than half a million people converged in D.C., and millions more gathered around the U.S. (and the world) making the March for Women the largest march in the history of the U.S. In D.C., a young girl takes in the sea of signs on the National Mall.

Home isn't just a place to nurture and protect, it's a place for taking action that can lead to great changes in the world. As a girl, I learned from my parents how many people secreted Jewish families in their homes during World War 2, how the Suffragettes convened in parlors, and how the Boston Tea party was a result of plans made (rather appropriately) over tea. So it was refreshing to be in Washington D.C. at the home of a friend-of-a-friend who provided warm spiked drinks, homemade popcorn, and stacks of blank signs and paint for the Women's March on Washington. 

I have thought a lot about what Coucou Home might look like in the present media landscape, and in addition to bucking the trend of documenting the beautified world in which too few people live, Coucou Home will be a haven for like-minded people to congregate, to spread love, not divisiveness. At this march, and at those throughout the day around the world, people gathered peacefully in protest of many things. I protested for my gay brother who was subjected to a form of gay conversion therapy Vice-Preisdent Mike Pence has supported vocally and through his actions.

But I also protested for my nieces because rights are not something that are guaranteed as history has taught us, nor can we say that women (or really any minority) has a truly equal place in America. Women fought hard for the right to vote less than a hundred years ago, which is hardly a distant memory, and we are still fighting for other things. As we have seen in places like Iran, rights can be taken away with the change of regime. Ask your Iranian women friends who lived and escaped Iran how they dressed before the rule of Ruhollah Khomeini versus after. But don't be confused. It's more than clothing that's at stake here. It's our humanity. And so we must continue to have these difficult conversations to find a middle way, and what better place to do so than in our homes. 


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